Welcome to Fusedspace Database





This exhibition, in The Hague, showed the results of an international competition seeking new ideas about the combination of technology and public space. We decided to show all 307 competition entries. To make this possible we invented display methods and pursued a two-fold approach to space, structuring the content as both a “database” and a “cityscape.”




Cityscape

Visitors wandered among large murals and could use hand-held barcode scanners to find out about each of the projects depicted in the murals. They could also enter into a space in the interior of each mural, where a computer terminal allowed them to search all entries.


Internal diagram: We tagged every project with keywords. Shared keywords can then form invisible trails among the projects.

Trailheads for invisible trails.



Barcodes identify individual projects 
in the murals.
Barcodes identify individual projects
in the murals.
Handheld barcode scanners let
“pedestrians” choose projects to
investigate in detail.
Handheld barcode scanners let
“pedestrians” choose projects to
investigate in detail.


After you scan a project you can see all of its images and read all about it.

A voice in pedestrians’ headsets lets them navigate invisible trails. The voice infers which trail you’re following by analyzing the projects you scan.



The plugged-in murals act as appliance, card catalog, graffiti, information surface, bookshelf, gutter, and finally architecture.


Database

A centralized computer server tracked and verbally announced the movements of all the hand-held barcode scanners, helping turn the gallery into a more civic space. When they left the gallery, visitors received a “receipt” with printed information about each of the projects they scanned.

With Min and Sulki Choi, Seoul.


A server visible in the basement monitors the moving barcode scanners using wifi. Everyone can see the projects the scanner users are scanning, and a voice announces them too.


Database terminals inside the murals present a different paradigm for exploring the material.

By spinning the trackball, visitors flip rapidly among the images, text, and trails, then choose what to investigate.


A printed receipt shows what you scanned. You can find all the projects again online at home.


The show’s exterior sign is the most recently scanned projects by each “pedestrian” (voetganger).

Flyers in the city link back to the database via the web.


Collaborative tools

We developed our own collaborative tools to help us read and tag all the proposals with a taxonomy that evolved as we read.